The Miracle of Feedback

[cs_content][cs_section parallax="false" separator_top_type="none" separator_top_height="50px" separator_top_angle_point="50" separator_bottom_type="none" separator_bottom_height="50px" separator_bottom_angle_point="50" style="margin: 0px;padding: 45px 0px;"][cs_row inner_container="true" marginless_columns="false" style="margin: 0px auto;padding: 0px;"][cs_column fade="false" fade_animation="in" fade_animation_offset="45px" fade_duration="750" type="1/1" style="padding: 0px;"][cs_text][dropcap]I[/dropcap] wake up smiling this morning because it's a beautiful, sunny day. The window is open and it doesn't feel cold outside. I get out of bed and dodge a few walls on my way to the bathroom. Then I shower, get dressed, and head out the door to work.

I look both ways before crossing the street, then I jump into my Honda.

I drive to the main intersection and wait for cars to pass. A Chrysler mini-van drives by, and I get behind it. At the light, I sneak a peak at my phone, and see that I have plenty of time to get to work. As I'm waiting, I think about how all my decisions have been affected by one thing — feedback.

And it made me wonder. Life is an absolute marvel, but what would life be without the ability to try new things, experience the unknown, and somehow have the feeling that you're progressing in life?

And yet, how can one progress or gain mastery of something without the miracle of feedback?

Feedback brings life

Peter Senge wrote a book titled The 5th Discipline, including the follow-up The 5th Discipline Field Book. I read the opening chapter of the Field Book in the bookstore over 10 years ago, and it always stuck with me. Here's the excerpt:

Among the tribes of northern Natal in South Africa, the most common greeting, equivalent to “hello” in English, is the expression: Sawu bona.

It literally means, “I see you.”

If you are a member of the tribe, you might reply by saying Sikhoma, “I am here.”

The order of the exchange is important: until you see me, I do not exist. It’s as if when you see me, you bring me into existence.

This meaning, implicit in the language, is part of the spirit of ubuntu, a frame of mind prevalent among native people in Africa below the Sahara. The word ubuntu stems from the folk saying Umuntu ngumuntu nagabantu, which, from Zulu, literally translates as: “A person is a person because other people.”

If you grow up with this perspective, your identity is based upon the fact that you are seen — that people around you respect and acknowledge you as a person.

Not long ago, an internal consultant who had been raised in a rural village became visibly upset after a meeting where nothing much had seemed to happen. When a project where he had played a key part came up for discussion, his role was not mentioned or acknowledged.

Asked later why it bothered him so much, he said, “You don’t understand. When they spoke about the project, they did not say my name. They did not make me a person.”

[x_line]

When we acknowledge each other, we activate a feedback loop. When we don't acknowledge one another, does a part of us disappear?

A simple "hello" and a smile can work miracles in someone's life.

It's our way of saying, "Sawu bona. I see you. You exist."

That's the power of feedback. That's the power of responding to a stimulus, internal or external.

Remember, communication is the response you get.

If someone yells at you, what did YOU say to them?

If someone kisses you, what did YOU do to them?

If someone spews hate and discontent toward you, what role did you play?

Are you listening?

There are two types of feedback that we're all working with.

External and internal feedback.

[x_blockquote cite="Jimmy Dean" type="left"]"I can't change the direction of the wind, but I can adjust my sails to always reach my destination."[/x_blockquote]

This quote speaks of external feedback.

You begin with a goal, make a move, sh*t happens, you make adjustments, and persevere towards the goal.

This kind of feedback comes from everywhere. Teachers give out grades in school. I smile at a woman and her look tells me whether she's interested or not. The crowd reaction I get depends on whether I make or miss my shot.

A wall tells me to go around it, objects on the floor ask me to step over them, and heat coming from the stove cautions me to keep a safe distance.

You're constantly receiving information (feedback) through your 5 senses, then you either correct course and keep moving forward or you give up on your goal entirely. Moving forward or quitting depends on two things: how difficult the next action step is AND how bad you want to accomplish that goal.

If you're highly skilled at dealing with feedback, you're likely to accomplish much more than the average person. Very likely.

If you're poorly skilled at receiving feedback, you're likely to settle for a life of mediocrity.

Internal feedback

[x_blockquote cite="Antoine de Saint-Exupéry" type="left"]"And now here is my secret, a very simple secret: It is only with the heart that one can see rightly; what is essential is invisible to the eye."[/x_blockquote]

That's INTERNAL feedback. You know when you know something. You know when something is just right for you.

Internal feedback is instinct, intuition, or that gut feeling. It's accumulated experience. It's wisdom.

Sometimes the world seems right, but you know something is wrong. That business deal seems right, but the person behind it is all bad. Conversely, sometimes things look bleak, but something about this person feels right.

You're constantly getting signals and cues from your inner and outer worlds, but are you listening?

[x_blockquote cite="Paulo Coelho" type="left"]“We always know which is the best road to follow, but we follow only the road that we have become accustomed to.”[/x_blockquote]

Your intuition tells you to approach him, but you're afraid of rejection.

Your gut tells you to go for the job, and that it's right for you, but you decide against it, rationalizing your lack of experience will somehow work against you.

Feedback is coming at you from everywhere. Again, are you listening?

Feedback deepens connections

According to George Anders, what's the most valuable skill to have in 2020? Empathy.

How can you empathize without feedback? And how can you get feedback from somebody if you're not in direct contact with them? It's impossible, yet empathy is lacking in every sector. People suffer as a result.

As organizations grow, they lose contact with the very people who can help them grow — employees, customers, and partners.

No contact, no empathy.

No empathy, no feedback.

No feedback, no adjustments will be made.

No adjustments made? See Kodak, Blockbuster, and Border's Books.

When you adjust, you also demonstrate empathy.

Sure, you can adjust based on analytics, data, and sheer manipulation, but it won't get you very far. Empathy seems like the obvious choice, but decision makers still don't get it.

Empathy is a culture. See Apple, Zappos, and Netflix.

Feedback is neutral

Most times, the feedback we get sucks and feels like a kick in the mouth.

To correct mistakes quickly, to address situations before they get out of hand, and to acknowledge the elephant in the room is not just critical to progress, it gives you an opportunity to find and express your humanity.

What good does it do anyone if get the message, only to ignore it?

What good does it do for you to see yourself in the mirror, notice those unwanted results, but return to the same routine?

What good does it do to look at your bank account, then continue with the same spending behaviors that keep you living from paycheck to paycheck?

What good does it do to look at your organization's subpar results, and continue the same behaviors that got you there?

See that dirt? Go ahead, sweep it under the rug. Soon a mound of dirt will pile up, waiting for someone to step on it, and *poof* everybody gets to taste it.

Feedback is neutral, it's not a personal attack on you.

Given what you're trying to accomplish in work or life, feedback asks you to change course, to adjust. Is that too difficult? Does the truth really hurt that bad? Indeed.

What if your quality of life was as simple as telling the truth about what you experience and then doing something about it?

Can you handle the truth?

Feedback increases engagement

I remember conducting a "feedback experiment" at the nonprofit I used to work for.

What would happen if we increased feedback for participants?

Could we accomplish more in one two-week workshop than we have in the previous ten workshops combined?

How will this affect long-term retention and engagement?

By gamifying the workshops — essentially increasing feedback using logged data — we outperformed the previous results by a factor of 10x. Sure, we measured outcomes better, but the quality of outcomes blew away past cohorts.

The lesson? Feedback is a powerful tool for individuals and organizations, and it's always right there, in your face.

Will you listen? Will you adjust and adapt?[/cs_text][/cs_column][/cs_row][/cs_section][/cs_content]


Conscious Taxes

It's the year 2036.

It's tax time again, and EVERYONE'S excited about it. You've been looking forward to this for almost 8 months because this is the first year in the history of the world that YOU get to decide where your tax dollars go.

Your decisions will have a direct impact on the immediate world around you, and after many decades of failed politics, poor economic policies, the people have finally wrested control over their communities and ecosystems. Politicians finally serve the people.

The Conscious Tax App

You register and sign into the Conscious Tax App for the first time, and you see all the money you were taxed for the previous year on the welcome screen:

$9,311.00

With this amount, you can invest in any program, policy, or plan you would like, as long as it's given back to the community.  The #1 law regarding taxes is that you CANNOT keep it for yourself, although you can direct it to institutions and programs that serve your interests.

You can give some to the local military or police, infrastructure to keep roads safe, education and schools, healthcare, social security, or even that local politician that works so hard to make sure plans are implemented wisely.

You click a button that leads you to all local proposals, such as a new commuter train system, housing renovations, getting rid of pesky potholes, upgrading local schools and improving agriculture standards.

Every proposal submitted includes:

[icon_list]

[icon_list style="color: green"][icon_list_item type="check"]Purpose (what problem does this solve?)[/icon_list_item]

[icon_list_item type="check"]Plan costs[/icon_list_item]

[icon_list_item type="check"]Benefits, which includes benefits to local ecosystem and surrounding cities[/icon_list_item]

[icon_list_item type="check"]Timeframe[/icon_list_item]

[icon_list_item type="check"]Negative outcomes (what negative consequences could result from this?)[/icon_list_item]

[icon_list_item type="check"]The current funding progress (plans will be initiated once funding is complete - people vote with their dollars)[/icon_list_item]

[icon_list_item type="check"]There's also a list of consequences (some speculative, some based on previous maintenance costs) associated with a plan if it's NOT funded fully. (Such a list might include no electricity for 2 months, projected 12% increase in criminal activity, 8% rise in higher drop out rates in school, etc.)[/icon_list_item]

[/icon_list]

So, what will you do with your tax money?

Responsibility

It's a bigger responsibility, making decisions that not only impact your household, but your entire community. And what if every decision involving every tax dollar was transparent? Others can see where your tax dollars go, and you can see where theirs go. Everybody's values would be on display.

Would you support schools and education, building towards a long term vision of your community? Or do you use your money to fund immediate needs, like road and bridge infrastructure? Should you fund that arts program for youth? Or do you allocate funds to that innovative pure water project that might NOT work?

How do you respond if you're championing a cause that isn't getting the necessary attention (or funding) you think it deserves? Wouldn't you get MORE involved? Wouldn't you attempt to make something happen?

Wouldn't 'conscious taxes' make everybody a de facto politician, making people responsible for swaying and influencing others to vote for the 'best' worldview imaginable?

How would YOU create the best ecosystem humanly possible? A place where all community members have the potential to thrive, without institutional barriers.

I see a world where public debate and discourse would increase. Civic engagement would shoot through the roof. Wall flowers would hit the dance floor.

Reality

The truth is, many people are disengaged from politics and policy making.

The truth is, nobody can pinpoint or know for sure where their tax dollars go - it's all based on what government tells us.

The truth is that a very small percentage of the population is involved in any form of civic engagement, let alone public debate - which is mostly left for the politicians and scholars.

Here, take a look at where your tax dollars are likely to end up:

bvs_taxesgo_1

bvs_taxesgo_2

This doesn't include Wall St. bailouts, senator's salary's and pension plans, nor all the wasteful spending that goes into a bureaucratic behemoth such as Washington D.C.

The question is, where do YOU want your money to go? To the military, and ongoing wars? Despite having the largest military in the WORLD, the United States spends an amount equal to the next closest 8 countries COMBINED.

0053_defense-comparison-crop

Is this really the best use of our money? Maybe you think so, but I don't. I'd be fine if you decided to throw your all your tax dollars at the military. I'd like to choose where my money goes, and focus on taking care of many of the social problems we continue to experience.

Are your tax dollars really in better hands with the government? Wouldn't it be nice to see the connection of YOUR actual dollars to the BENEFITS you're meant to receive?

Instead of having a disengaged populace, don't you think the level of awareness regarding local problems/solutions would raise in communities with tax spending in the hands of people? Perhaps political corruption would cease as a result.

I don't have any answers, just a bunch of questions.

With a little imagination, innovation, and "conscious taxes", I'm sure we can do much, much better even if it's in 2036. I hope much sooner.

Perhaps one day we can log-in to the Conscious Tax App, and start directing the future of our communities and country.

I can dream.

Paul


Let go my Lego: The ultimate Lego productivity hack

"What are you doing?? Just start building. No more talking!"

It's November in San Francisco. I'm in a conference room somewhere in the Twitter building playing with legos with a colleague and other strangers looking to build their businesses.

Why are we playing with legos?

"That's how you're going to develop your business models," says our facilitator.

It may seem strange to you, but I learned a new way to look at developing new (even innovative) business models using legos. It takes practice, of course.

It's not as easy as it looks, but the surprising takeaway comes after our facilitator challenges us through another exercise. My colleague and I are debating a business idea, and we're going back and forth and our facilitator comes over and says emphatically...

"What are you doing?? Just start building. You build yours, and you build yours. No more talking!"

I laugh because I get it. Talking is just another form of procrastination, and overthinking something that doesn't need more thinking. Just do it, and let the answers develop through process.

“The secret to getting ahead is getting started.”

-Mark Twain

Lego lessons in action

The other day I wrote Love Improv #1, a freestyle piece that developed in my head organically. I had a blank screen staring at me, and decided to apply lego lesson numero uno. I begin to write, and shortly after, another post is up.

Just begin.

Just build.

Just write.

Don't worry about how it looks. Don't concern yourself with the end.

Just go along for the ride. You'll surprise yourself where you end up sometimes.

Sometimes the best way to begin is to just begin.

Starting is the best productivity hack in the entire universe.

Imagine how much you could accomplish if you started wherever you happened to be, with whatever resources were available?

Finally, if you're worried about making mistakes, then you simply don't understand how anything worthwhile gets built, created, designed, or developed.


During our break, the facilitator offers us some food. As I head around the hallway towards the dining area, I see a big poster on wall that says:

make mistakes

Of course.

Paul


One Step Closer

I was thinking the other day...

Life is hard.

I thought about this. Nothing seems easy. If I want to live, work is required. The expenditure of energy is necessary to get results. Every action has an equal and opposite reaction. No action, no results.

Yes, life is hard, but withholding my energy from some person or project not only makes my life harder, it makes it less fulfilling.

What are you giving to life? What are you getting back?

Accomplishing anything worthwhile requires so much hard work.

If I want to accomplish anything noteworthy or worthwhile, then hard work is mandatory. There is no short cut, no easy hack, no magic pill to swallow. Busting my ass is the only answer to achieving anything worthwhile.

I think about the things I want to see in the world...

  • write a few books
  • create a magazine
  • develop a few apps
  • Tibet, India and the Himalayas
  • Siberia
  • perform on stage, either as speaker or actor
  • a stronger, healthier body

None of it is easy. There are no short-cuts. I have to put in the time and practice, the energy and effort to make it all happen.

All of these things require devotion. It's not a word I use very often, but if there's no devotion, then I'll never put in the time.

devotion |diˈvōSHən|

noun

love, loyalty, or enthusiasm for a person, activity, or cause

What are you devoted to?

Most of the time, I don't WANT to do the hard work.

I don't want to do the hard work most of the time. I'd rather relax, watch a Youtube video or sports, read a book, or surf the internet. Who wants to work out and exercise? Who wants to write everyday especially when you don't feel like it?

I'm learning that when I face the hurdle of not wanting to do something, then I should find someone that does. In the connected world and economy that we live in, it's not that hard to find someone who compliments your skill set.

Stop whining about hard work and figure out what you're willing to work hard on.

Then find other people to do the hard work you want no part of.

Collaboration is a lesson I'm learning (the hard way).

Who do you know that can do the things you don't want to do?

It's easy to do nothing and be lazy.

Initiating a new project is exciting and invigorating, but after the excitement ends, real work needs to get done. It becomes easy to do nothing and get a little lazy.

But I've noticed something about my laziness. I'm lazy when I'm not clear on what to do next, and I'm not clear on what to do next because I don't have enough reasons to BE CLEAR. Kinda circular, I know.

Knowing your "why?" is crucial to doing anything in life.

I'm also lazy if I'm doing something I've never done before and I know my process is going to be very inefficient.

What if all laziness was a by-product of my inability to see clearly? What if laziness was simply a result of my own uncertainty?

If the next steps aren't clear to me, then I can be sure of one thing: I will definitely procrastinate.

Define the next steps with clarity. Be concrete. Write it down. 12 different people should be able to take what you've written down, perform the next steps, and produce similar results.

If you're being lazy or procrastinating then spend more time being clear. If a problem repeats itself or still confuses you, then spend more time defining the actual problem.

Clarity (easy to perceive, understand, or interpret) = Power (the ability to do something or act in a particular way)

The more CLEAR you are, the more POWER you will exhibit.

Remember that.

It's easy to quit when things get tough.

And it will get tough. I start a project and pretty soon I find that there's something or someone I don't know, something I don't know how to do, or a task that is beyond my current skill level.

Starting Everybody's Famous quickly taught me what I didn't know, and what I'd have to learn quickly.

  • Will this venture succeed? How can I validate a magazine, actually get people to fork over their cash for something that doesn't exist yet?
  • How will this magazine earn money? What's the business model? What will people pay for? What's the value being delivered?
  • What kind of corporation is it? LLC, C, S, or B?
  • Since the magazine requires content, stories from local communities, where will that content come from? How will we find those people? How do we tell compelling stories that engages just about anybody?
  • What other legal considerations, ethical questions need to be answered?
  • I'm not a journalist. I'm not a photographer or videographer. I'm not an audiophile. EFM is a multi-media magazine, so I'm going to have to learn fast. Each one of those statements comes with a bunch of questions, research, and activities.

I could be here all day listing everything I don't know about how to run a magazine or a business, but the point is, each one of these challenges are learning opportunities. And learning requires lots of mistakes. Lots of them.

In the beginning of learning anything, there will be a disproportionate amount of mistakes to what you do right. Know this and suck it up.

It's easy to quit when you suck at something, but anything worth doing is worth doing POORLY.

Do it wrong, learn, and grow. Just don't quit when things get tough.

But I don't know "how?"

I learned a few years back NEVER to ask how to do something until I've tried it first. I never realized that question could be used as a cop out from true action. I'd say 90% of the people who ask "how?" before any research or taking some kind of action are not truly serious.

I used to be like that, maybe not verbally but definitely in my head. I found over time that if someone has enough desire, has enough reasons to do something, they'll find a way to make it happen.

I also found that if I dug down deep enough into a problem or project that the next step to take was always within my line of sight. Even if I couldn't see beyond that next step, I always knew what the very next step was, and once I took it, then next one would reveal itself.

Stop playing around. You know what the next step is. The next step you need to take for your relationships. Your business. Your community. Be responsible and take it. Stop asking "how?" and just do it. At least Nike got that right.

Oh, and from now on, replace "how?" with "why?" to get to the heart of things. If your purpose isn't strong enough, it won't get done anyway, regardless of all the how-to books in the world.

WHY always beats HOW.

I can do so much better...

Really? You can have a better relationship, a better job, a better home, and a better life?

Then do something about it.

'Better' requires a little bit of faith. Faith requires a clear vision.

If you don't have a vision for your life and all your ideals - your ideal average day, your ideal relationship, your ideal job, etc. - then you won't act. You'll talk and talk and talk, but nothing will get done.

Faith and risk require a solid vision or plain ignorance. You'll go on with your sh*tty job and your mediocre lifestyle, but nothing will get 'better' unless you see things clearly and ACT.

So basic, but it's easy to get caught up in our own heads.

Besides, if you have a clear vision and are taking the necessary actions to see it through, you'll be able to put up with that sh*tty job a little while longer. Your time there is coming to an end, and you KNOW it. It's just a matter of time.

Can you imagine? Working that job and having no light at the end of the tunnel?

Having no vision sucks. Not acting at all is worse.

C'mon, let's do this. Life can be better for all of us, and you know it.

What's your next step?

For work?

In your relationships?

For your health?

For recreation and travel?

For learning?

For your money?

Clarity is one step closer. Take a step towards your vision today.

Even if it's tiny and miniscule.

Just one.

Paul


Now what?

I was listening to an audio book written by a business coach on the way to work this morning. She told the story of a client who accomplished her so-called dream job and the much coveted corner office. After a few months, her client began to feel empty inside, and was left asking, now what?

She thought she had everything she wanted, but what she accomplished didn't hold the personal satisfaction she thought she was looking for.

I know, first world problems, but I've witnessed the other side of the spectrum. I help people who have been homeless or formerly incarcerated get back on their feet, and many times they also end up in the same place - now what? They think they wanted the clothes, the car, a new apartment, a certain type of man/woman, but many end up in the same place.

Now what?

Now what? can become a serious problem if you don't know how to deal with it. Many get to the now what? space and turn to drugs, sex, gambling, binge TV watching, food, shopping, etc. If you don't understand that empty feeling inside, then a quick fix solution is to fill it up with something as fast as possible.

Stuffing your face full of food, smoking a little weed, flipping through channels or Youtube, and spending hard earned money on clothes you may only wear a few times are ways to fill the void inside. The only problem with these tactics is that they only mask the problem, but the truth is still waiting for you.

I experience now what? after every project is completed. I sometimes experience it after an epic blog post. I remember that now what? feeling when I came back from Europe and South America. The feeling comes and if there's no answer after the question has been asked, then I can get a little depressed.

Now what? is there to remind you that humans were meant to grow and evolve. It doesn't mean that you need to be working on something ALL the damn time. When I was in Europe I discovered my love for writing, worked on creative projects, and was free to travel when and where I pleased.

Nothing's changed since then because I still have those options, but my now what? feeling taught me to break from the norm, chuck the routine and live spontaneously - even if for a couple of weeks. I learned a lot about myself, discovered new worlds, and coming back to ordinary life taught me to want more.

Takeaways

How do you deal with that now what? feeling?

Here are a few things to remember:

  1. Now what? is a sign that you're ready to tackle a new project or problem. Ask yourself, what problem bugs me that I want to solve? Let ideas flow to you.
  2. Now what? could be a signal that you've lost sight of your personal vision, mission, or purpose in life. Call it what you want, but I believe everybody ought to be working on ideas, using their talents and gifts in unique ways to solve people problems. What are 3 big things you would like to accomplish this year? Next year? In the next 10 years? Use whatever timeline you want, just make it longer than this week.
  3. Now what? could be reminding you that what you're doing is not YOU. You're doing it because you think it will give you recognition from your boss, peers and colleagues, some dude or chic, or your parents. If you're not living life for YOU, then you may get that corner office, and in a few months be asking WTF?! Be yourself is the most cliche'd and BS advice given in the world, but powerful if carried out to its fullest expression. So, be your mutha f'n self! (I hate cliches)
  4. Now what? could be a time to sit with NO stimulation. Stop avoiding the void, and deal with it. The truth is sitting in the dark, waiting for you to face it. Whether you meet it sooner or later, it's there - the loneliness, the despair, the anger, and the I don't know what the f*** I'm doing feeling. The truth is undefeated, so taking drugs or some other escape is only prolonging the inevitable. Deal with your sh*t, head up.
  5. And finally, now what? could be telling you to relax and chill for a moment. Stop trying to make everything happen. If you're running solely off your head and not listening to your heart, you're going to have a tough life. Give in sometimes, and surrender to the almighty NOTHINGNESS. There's something powerfully peaceful in the VOID. It's just hell getting there.

Paul


What a career coach's resume looks like

My new resume design took me awhile to put together. I played with it, I wanted it to stand out, and I GET that the content could use some cleaning up, but here it is anyway. It's a work in progress, as all resumes are.

You may drag this resume onto your desktop for further examination.

You can also download a PDF version at the bottom of this post.

Paul

Paul Campillo's resume

Feel free to download a PDF version of this resume by clicking on the link below.

[download id="9" format="1"]


Find your passion

"Find your passion."

I agree. No matter what, experiment until you find something that excites you, makes you wake up smiling, and causes you to lose sleep.

This guy thinks that following your passion is bad advice - when it comes to earning money:

http://vimeo.com/85927282

Being passionate about a hobby or activity may or may not translate to economic value. However, being passionate about something you do can bring you immense personal value, and is a great place to start. Personal projects could eventually affect your pocketbook.

He makes a good point, but I'd like to counter with this:

If you're interested in making lots of money or being an entrepreneur, then I'd argue that passion is CRITICAL to your venture.

But not passion about an activityhobby, a job title, or social status, but being...

passionate about a problem.

You may have heard the phrase 'create value' before. That's just a fancy way of saying 'solve someone's problem'. Take the attention off what makes you feel great, and put your attention on problems that make people miserable (or unhappy, or hopeless, or bored, or disconnected, or whatever).

I'm saying be passionate about a problem then become a hero to all the people that particular problem affects. A problem doesn't necessarily have to be something that ruins a person's life, it can be seen as providing an experience that doesn't currently exist in their lives, such as Disneyland.

So be passionate about problems ONLY if you want to turn your passion into economic value.

Go ahead and be passionate about poverty.

Be passionate about homelessness.

Be passionate about corrupt politicians and government.

Be passionate about expensive taxi services. (Thanks Uber)

Be passionate about crappy restaurant service.

Be passionate about the lack of nutrition in our schools.

Be passionate about the incredible high school dropout rate in our country.

Be passionate about the slow internet service in the U.S. (Someone please take out Comcast, AT&T, et al.)

Be passionate about a problem that bugs or pisses you off so much that you're constantly seeking out other options. Chances are, you're not the only one, and there you have a market. If a problem bugs you, then you're your first customer.

And the sweet spot? Being passionate about what you do and how what you do helps alleviate another person's problem. If you get to this stage, you will experience some awesome highs along the way.

Questions

What problem(s) bother you?

What area of your life needs the most improvement? Relationships? Work/career/business? Health? Money? Learning? Why?

If a miracle happened and all of a sudden your life was almost perfect, what would have changed in your life?

Finally

Remember this: problems are screaming opportunities, waiting for someone to solve, alleviate, or improve.

What will you do to create some value in the world and make it a better place to live, not just for yourself, but for others?

Paul

be passionate about a problem